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Anti-Aging Therapy

Keep Glowing Medical Spa

What is Aging?

Physiologically, aging can be defined as a progressive function decline or a gradual deterioration of physiological function with age, including a decrease in fertility, or age-related loss of viability and increase in vulnerability [1-3]. Starting at age 30 functionality begins to decrease and morality begins to exponentially increase. After age 30 our fertility and ability to reproduce begin to decrease, the incidence of diseases increase, our flexibility, endurance, muscle mass and bone density all begin to decrease. It is believed that aging occurs at a cellular level [4-5] due to the actions of different types of stressors such as oxidative damage, telomere attrition (wearing away), the decline of DNA repair and protein turnover [6-7]. The leading hypothesis in aging currently is that aging is due to the wearing away of telomeres [8].

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What are telomeres and how do they function in the body and in the aging process?

Telomeres are protective elements that are on the ends of our DNA that prevent fusion of chromosomes during replication [9-10]. During each cycle of DNA replication, which happens hundreds of times per day depending on the cell type, a small piece of the telomere is lost. Once the telomere is completely destroyed, the cell will begin making defective proteins and cells [8]. Once our cells begin to accumulate defective proteins and cells, they being to create, and accumulate, metabolic waste within the body which causes damage to other cells. This metabolic waste, and damage to cells, causes diseases to develop, such as cancers, heart disease, etc., which eventually lead to further decline of the person and death.

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What are telomeres and how do they function in the body and in the aging process?

Telomeres are protective elements that are on the ends of our DNA that prevent fusion of chromosomes during replication [9-10]. During each cycle of DNA replication, which happens hundreds of times per day depending on the cell type, a small piece of the telomere is lost. Once the telomere is completely destroyed, the cell will begin making defective proteins and cells [8]. Once our cells begin to accumulate defective proteins and cells, they being to create, and accumulate, metabolic waste within the body which causes damage to other cells. This metabolic waste, and damage to cells, causes diseases to develop, such as cancers, heart disease, etc., which eventually lead to further decline of the person and death.

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What can be done to help slow the aging process?

Unfortunately, there is no magic treatment that can slow or reverse the aging process. Luckily there are a combination of things that can be done to help slow the aging process. There is little debate that living a “healthy lifestyle,” consisting of a healthy diet, exercise and avoiding unhealthy things like smoking and excessive alcohol, can, not only prolong the length of our lives, but can also improve the quality of the years we live. Research has shown that reversing age-related hormonal lose may be beneficial in slowing the aging process. These therapies are not a “get out of jail free card” as they still require you to live a healthy lifestyle. Some of these therapies have been shown to reverse some of the effects of aging such as loss of muscle mass and exercise capacity, hair thinning and loss, fatigue, and loss of bone density.

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Melatonin

Melatonin is a naturally occurring hormone that is involved in the circadian rhythm and sleep. It has been hypothesized that there may be some association between melatonin and aging and life-extension [11-12]. Melatonin is thought to have an antioxidant function within the brain and may delay the aging process and many age-related diseases [13-14]. There is limited human data on the effects of melatonin on aging but it may remain an option.

DHEA

DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone) is a hormone that is produced and released from the adrenal glands and serves as a precursor to other hormones in the body such as testosterone and estrogen. DHEA levels peak in late adulthood and then slowly decrease as we age. DHEA has been reported to increase the wellbeing of elderly people by way of improved memory, immune system, muscle mass, sexual drive, and benefits to the skin.

Growth Hormone

It is widely accepted that growth hormone (GH) secretion undergoes an age-related decrease [15-16]. This decrease in GH causes a decrease in insulin-life growth factor 1 (IGF-1), which is the active hormone derived from GH in the body. The proposed mechanisms of decreased GH levels include: decreased release of growth hormone releasing-hormone (GHRH), increased release of somatostatin (growth hormone inhibition hormone), and increased sensitivity to IGF-1 feedback [17]. GH release in the body is tightly regulated. The image below shows the normal physiology of GH.

Figure 1: GHRH is released from the hypothalamus and causes the pituitary gland to release GH. GH causes the adipose tissue to release free fatty acids (FFA) and the liver to release IGF-1. IGF-1 circulates and causes effects throughout the body. IGF-1 and FFA also act on the hypothalamus and pituitary gland to stop the release of GHRH and GH. GH is not widely used because of the side effects associated with it. If you are using exogenous GH, you lose the natural regulatory pathway because growth hormone levels are no longer dependent on GHRH. This increases the risk of certain types of cancers, joint and muscle pain, and increased insulin resistance.

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Growth Hormone Releasing Peptides – Sermorelin & Ipamorelin

Growth hormone releasing peptides (GHRP) mimic the actions of naturally produced growth hormone releasing hormone. As aging occurs and hormone levels change, specifically GH, GHRH, and IGF-1, leading to the consequences of aging [17]. GHRP have been shown to restore GH and IGF-1 levels. The benefit of GHRP, when compared to exogenous GH, is that the natural regulatory pathway stays intact, which assures that GH levels are not too high in the body. This makes anti-aging therapy with GHRP one of the safest options we currently have. We use two peptides at Keep Glowing Medical Spa, Sermorelin and Ipamorelin. Sermorelin and Ipamorelin both cause release of growth hormone from the pituitary gland but they work in different ways, due to this difference, these peptides can be used in conjunction to improve results.

Growth Hormone Releasing Peptides – Sermorelin & Ipamorelin

Growth hormone releasing peptides (GHRP) mimic the actions of naturally produced growth hormone releasing hormone. As aging occurs and hormone levels change, specifically GH, GHRH, and IGF-1, leading to the consequences of aging [17]. GHRP have been shown to restore GH and IGF-1 levels. The benefit of GHRP, when compared to exogenous GH, is that the natural regulatory pathway stays intact, which assures that GH levels are not too high in the body. This makes anti-aging therapy with GHRP one of the safest options we currently have. We use two peptides at Keep Glowing Medical Spa, Sermorelin and Ipamorelin. Sermorelin and Ipamorelin both cause release of growth hormone from the pituitary gland but they work in different ways, due to this difference, these peptides can be used in conjunction to improve results.

Sermorelin:

Sermorelin mimics endogenous GHRH. After injected, sermorelin is absorbed into the blood stream, travels through the body and binds to GHRH receptors on the pituitary. This then causes the pituitary gland to release GH into the blood stream. The release GH then circulates in the blood and goes through the normal pathway in the body.

Ipamorelin:

Ipamorelin mimics a hormone in the body that was discovered in 1999, ghrelin. Ipamorelin work similarly to sermorelin except it binds to ghrelin receptors on the pituitary and causes release of growth hormone via a different pathway. In addition to increasing endogenous growth hormone levels, ipamorelin has the added benefit of having a regulatory effects on metabolism, including increasing or decreasing hunger, and inhibition of stored fat breakdown.

What are the signs of low growth hormone levels?

After age 30 growth hormone levels begin to decrease in both men and women. A person who has too little adult growth hormone will have symptoms that include: A higher level of body fat, especially around the waist

  • Anxiety

  • Depression

  • Decreased sexual function and interest

  • Fatigue

  • Less muscle (lean body mass) causing decreased strength, stamina and ability to exercise without taking a rest

  • Reduced bone density and a tendency to have more bone fractures

  • Negative effects on blood cholesterol levels (Higher LDLs and TGs)

How can I benefit from therapy with GHRP?

Clinical studies have shown that treatment with GHRP and resultant increase in growth hormone levels can have a positive mental and physical effect, some proposed benefits are:

  • Increased lean body mass

  • Fat reduction

  • Improved energy

  • Increased vitality

  • Increased strength

  • Increased endurance

  • Increased mood

  • Increased libido and sexual function

  • Accelerated wound healing

  • Improved cardiovascular and immune function

  • Better sleep quality

  • Improved bone density

  • Improved skin quality and higher collagen density

  • Hair strengthening and regrowth

What are the side effects to using GHRP?

Ipamorelin is widely considered one of the safest and most effective peptide treatments available. Sermorelin has been known to cause flushing, headaches, nausea, dizziness, and redness or swelling around the injection site for some people. Ipamorelin’s possible side effects mirror that of sermorelin, with headaches and nausea topping the list of infrequent occurrences caused by the impressively safe peptide. Both peptides are largely safe and side effects free when used in the doses prescribed by a qualified medical practitioner (Merriam et al, 2001).

 

As is the case with the administration of any Hormone Replacement Therapy, systemic or local allergic responses can sometimes result. It is vital that you be aware that such responses can potentially occur. If you do suffer an allergic reaction as a result of GHRP therapy. it is vital that they receive medical attention promptly.

 

The most common reaction to GHRP therapy, which is related to treatment, is local irritation around the injection site, which occurs in around one of every six people. This irritation is characterized by redness, pain, or swelling. Though this side effect is relatively common, only a small minority of patients find the irritation bothersome enough to suspend therapy. Out of a sample of 350 people who underwent GHRP therapy in clinical trial, only three suspended therapy as a result of injection-site irritation. There are other side effects which occurred in less than one percent of clients. These side effects include: severe drowsiness, hives, vomiting, headache, nausea, difficulty swallowing, hyperactivity, chest tightness and pallor, distortion in perception of taste, and flushing of the skin.

 

Clinical Tests have shown that increased blood-serum levels of IGF-1, Human Growth Hormone, alkaline phosphatase, and inorganic mineral phosphorus can occur as a result of GHRP therapy. You will be asked to have periodic blood work ordered either by our clinic or your primary care physician during the course of your therapy.

What steps should I take next if I think I could benefit from GHRP therapy?

If you would like to be evaluated for therapy you can contact our office by phone or email. We will send you a set of intake forms and once those are completed we will meet in person and discuss your results. We will check labwork and prescribe medications as clinically indicated. Please understand, WE DO NOT PRESCRIBE HUMAN GROWTH HORMONE NOR ANY OF ITS SIMILAR ANALOGS AT KEEP GLOWING MEDICAL SPA.

Citations

[1] Partridge, L., and Mangel, M. (1999). “Messages from mortality: the evolution of death rates in the old.” Trends in Ecology and Evolution 14(11):438-442.

[2] Lopez-Otin, C., Blasco, M. A., Partridge, L., Serrano, M., and Kroemer, G. (2013). “The hallmarks of aging.” Cell 153(6):1194-1217.

[3] Comfort, A. (1964). Ageing: The Biology of Senescence. Routledge & Kegan Paul, London.

[4] de Magalhaes, J. P. (2004). “From cells to ageing: a review of models and mechanisms of cellular senescence and their impact on human ageing.” Exp Cell Res 300(1):1-10.

[5] de Magalhaes, J. P., and Faragher, R. G. (2008). “Cell divisions and mammalian aging: integrative biology insights from genes that regulate longevity.” Bioessays 30(6):567-578.

[6] Kirkwood TB. Understanding the odd science of aging. Cell. 2005;120:437–447.

[7] Vijg J, Campisi J. Puzzles, promises and a cure for ageing. Nature. 2008;454:1065–1071.

[8] Wright, W. E., and Shay, J. W. (2001). “Cellular senescence as a tumor-protection mechanism: the essential role of counting.” Curr Opin Genet Dev 11(1):98-103.

[9] Muller, H. J. (1938). “The remaking of chromosomes.” Collecting Net 13(8):182-198.

[10] McClintock, B. (1941). “The stability of broken ends of chromosomes in Zea mays.” Genetics 26:234-282.

[11] Froy, O., and Miskin, R. (2007). “The interrelations among feeding, circadian rhythms and ageing.” Prog Neurobiol 82(3):142-150.

[12] Kondratov, R. V. (2007). “A role of the circadian system and circadian proteins in aging.” Ageing Res Rev 6(1):12-27.

[13] Poeggeler, B. (2005). “Melatonin, aging, and age-related diseases: perspectives for prevention, intervention, and therapy.” Endocrine 27(2):201-212.

[14] Karasek, M. (2004). “Melatonin, human aging, and age-related diseases.” Exp Gerontol 39(11-12):1723-1729.

[15] Ghigo E, Arvat E, Goffi S, Bellone J, Nicolosi M, Procopio M, Maccario M, Camanni. Neural control of growth hormone secretion in aged humans. In: Muller EE, Cocchi D, Locatelli V, eds. Growth hormone and somatomedins during lifespan. Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1993:275–87.

[16] Corpas E, Harman SM, Blackman S. Human growth hormone and human aging. Endocr Rev 1993;14:20–39.

[17] Thorner MO, Chapman IM, Gaylinn BD, Pezzoli SS, Hartman ML. Growth hormone-releasing hormone and growth hormone-releasing peptide as therapeutic agents to enhance growth hormone secretion in disease and aging. Recent Prog Horm Res. 1997;52:215-44; discussion 244-6.

[18] Olarescu NC, Gunawardane K, Hansen TK, et al. Normal Physiology of Growth Hormone in Adults. [Updated 2019 Oct 16]. In: Feingold KR, Anawalt B, Boyce A, et al., editors. Endotext [Internet]. South Dartmouth (MA): MDText.com, Inc.; 2000-. Figure 2. [Factors that stimulate and suppress GH secretion under physiological conditions.].